We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We Asked

Bristol’s inclusive and sustainable economic growth strategy is focused on productivity-driven growth, together with the fair distribution of economic contributions and benefits. It also takes as a guiding principle that economic growth should not come at the expense of environmental and health standards. Accordingly, this strategy concerns itself with economic, social and environmental outcomes.
 
This Action Plan has been co-produced with a wide range of agencies and organisations across the city, but it will still benefit from further consultation to garner greater engagement and agreement. The aim is for the action plan to provide the framework for delivering the Strategy.

This Action Plan should serve as the starting point for developing and influencing a wide range of projects across Bristol City Council, the City Office and key delivery partners to guide a more focused and collaborative approach to inclusive and sustainable economic growth.

We consulted on the themes, priorities, and actions in this Action Plan.

You Said

We received 22 responses to the Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth Action Plan consultation.

We asked for comments on the proposed actions to deliver the Inclusive & Sustainable Economic Growth Strategy. You told us that many of the proposed actions were low priority. Due to this, we will focus on the actions identified as higher priority.

We asked for your views on the ways we will measure successful delivery. You told us that many of the metrics were unnecessary. Due to this, we have produced a more concise sets of metrics and will use them to report progress each year.

We Did

As a result of the online consultation and discussions with key stakeholders across the city, the action plan and associated metrics have been rationalised. There are now a set of 83 actions, across three timescales – short (to 2020), medium (to 2028) and long (to 2040) – and seven key metrics that will be used to report on the effectiveness of the action plan in delivering the strategic objectives. A full report on the consultation, together with the revised action plan and metrics, will be presented to Cabinet this summer.

We Asked

The proposals for an informal crossing point were included in the planning application documents. In terms of the consultations carried out on the original consent there was a site and press notice and 63 neighbours consulted; all the plans were available to view online.

There was an informal consultation from 7 December 2018 to 11 January 2019.

You can read further details in the Frequently Asked Questions and Way Forward document.

In addition to the informal consultation, we carried out a technical study and pedestrian count.

You Said

There were 67 separate comments on the proposals with 61 objections, 5 in favour and 1 neutral.

We Did

Bearing in mind the level of objection in mind, it is proposed that the design is revisited. The new proposals will be submitted as a variation to the original condition on the planning application and officers will ensure that affected frontagers are consulted as part of this process.

You can read further details in the Frequently Asked Questions and Way Forward document.

We Asked

The proposals for waiting restrictions (double yellow lines etc.) at junctions, resident driveways and school access points to prevent obstructive parking and to provide informal crossing places for pedestrians were consulted on between 7 December 2018 and 4 January 2019.

You Said

Bristol City Council received overwhelming support for the scheme improvements and there have been a number of additional requests for double yellow lines across driveways.

We Did

We have now drawn up a waiting restriction scheme which in order to install, will need to go through a Statutory Consultation process for the Traffic Regulation Order required.  This is a sometimes lengthy legal process which will involve placing a Notice of Intent in the local press and posting Notices on site to advertise the proposals.  Depending on the nature and level of objections and support for the scheme, the Director: Management of Place, Bristol City Council will decide if it is appropriate to pursue the scheme.  The proposed highway works will be progressed separately and should be installed by the end of the year.

We Asked

Bristol City Council is proposing to introduce an additional licensing scheme to 12 central wards in Bristol subject to Cabinet endorsement.

This consultation asked about a revised fee structure for this scheme. You can see the full consultation details here.

You Said

We received 257 responses to this consultation, the results of which are available in the consultation report.

We Did

The licensing scheme was approved by Cabinet on 2 April 2019. The scheme goes live on 8 July 2019.

Further information on property licences

We Asked

The consultation on the Council’s 2019/20 budget was open for six weeks from 5 November 2018 until 17 December 2018. Individual responses were received via the survey and face-to-face interviews, and additional responses were received from organisations and individuals via email.

More information about what we consulted on is available in the consultation survey.

You Said

We received 4,644 responses to the Budget consultation 2019/20, the results of which are available in the Budget 2019/20 consultation report.

4,521 (97%) of the 4,644 respondents stated the level Council Tax increase they would support in 2019/20, from the five options provided:

  • The option which received most support (40% of respondents) was a 4% increase in Council Tax. 
  • The option with the second highest level of support (25%) was ‘no increase to Council Tax’.
  • 17% would prefer a Council Tax increase of 3%. 
  • 10% of respondents would support a 2% increase
  • 8% would prefer a 1% increase.

We Did

The consultation feedback was taken into consideration in developing final recommendations for the council’s budget which were put to Full Council on 26 February 2019. Full Council agreed the council’s budget for 2018/19.

Council Tax will rise by 3.99%, which includes 1% to support Adult Social Care.

The approved General Fund net revenue budget for the year 2019/20 totals £376.3m.

The approved capital budget for the years 2019/20 - 2023/24, totals £856.8 m.

The approved Schools budget totals £356.9m for 2019/20, which will be funded by the Dedicated Schools Grant.

Further details are available on the Full Council meeting page.

We Asked

The commissioning intentions were laid out to the providers and public and as a part of the consultation five questions were asked within it. An open question was asked to allow for an opportunity to demonstrate and concern or agreement that may not have previously been captured. The consultation focused on collecting feedback on these questions. Feedback was analysed using the following methods.


1. Consultation questionnaire – the questionnaire asked for peoples comments’ on the questions within the strategy. To view the consultation questionnaire, see Appendix A.
2. Consultation events- the events asked for people’s responses to the consultation questions.
3. Emails from providers who have expressed an interest in tendering for this provision
4. 1:1 Interviews and Group sessions with people of lived experience of advocacy

You Said

We received 65 responses to the consultation survey, the results of which are available in the Advocacy and Healthwatch Commissioning consultation report.

We Did

Stage 1
We will publish the final Advocacy and HealthWatch Commissioning plan after Cabinet in February. This will set out the new model for commissioning services.
 

Stage 2
We plan to launch the formal tender process. It is envisaged this will be in Quarter 1 2019.

We Asked

The draft Bristol Transport Strategy went out to public consultation in the Autumn of 2018. The consultation consisted of a number of engagement measures, which included:

  • A questionnaire;
  • An online simulator tool to identify transport priorities;
  • A video and social media content;
  • Questions within the Citizens Panel survey;
  • Engagement with community groups across the city;
  • Presentations at events and forums across the city;
  • An easy read and audio version made available;
  • Materials distributed to libraries across the city.

You Said

In total, 3,189 responses were received and over 5,000 individual comments were analysed. The vast majority of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the objectives and the approaches of the draft strategy, therefore these will remain in the final draft.

The draft Bristol Transport Strategy sets out approaches that seek to invest in sustainable transport modes and includes transformative measures such as mass transit and the consultation has shown that this approach is widely supported by the public.

We wanted to explore the public’s view on how we seek to fund the measures set out in the draft Bristol Transport Strategy and there appears to be support for road user charging and workplace parking levy, subject to the details of such schemes, which would need to be identified in future studies. Increasing council tax or business rates to fund transport schemes are not well supported and we will reflect this in the final edit.

We Did

We have created a report outlining the approach to consultation and the responses received. We are now preparing to take this report, along with the suggested edits to the draft Bristol Transport Strategy as a result of the comments received, up the decision pathway to Cabinet in July 2019 with a view to publish the final Bristol Transport Strategy in the summer.

We Asked

As part of the Safer Routes to Schools schemes, a zebra crossing and raised table was proposed on Bamfield located on a route to and from Perry Court E-Act Academy. 

You Said

The result of the consultation were on the whole positive for the proposed Zebra Crossing and speed table on Bamfield.

We Did

The proposal has been passed to the Traffic Regulation Order team for the legal process where there will be a formal consultation process.

We Asked

As part of the ‘Safer Routes to Schools’ schemes, a Zebra Crossing and raised table was proposed on Novers Lane. This was proposed for a location on a route to and from Greenfield E-Act Academy. 

You Said

The result of the consultation were on the whole positive for the proposed Zebra Crossing on Novers Lane.

We Did

The proposal has been passed to the Traffic Regulation Order team for the legal process where there will be a formal consultation process.’

We Asked

We had a 4 week public consultation period on the Publication Version of the Urban Living Supplementary Planning Document and the Consultation Statement prior to being adopted by the Cabinet in late Autumn 2018.

The consultation opened on the 28th August, with a Bristol City Council press release on the 3rd September 2018 publicising the 4-week consultation inviting views on the revised document until 25th September.

You Said

Please read the updated Consultation Statement document which reports on the consultation response.

We Did

We Asked

We asked your views on how the 20mph speed limit operates in practice. The aim of the 20mph review was to identify whether any localised adjustments are needed to the 20mph speed limit across the City in order to improve its effectiveness.

You Said

We received 3,351 responses to this consultation.

We Did

We will communicate the next steps soon.

We Asked

We proposed an improved approach to rough sleeping encampments in light of the growing number of encampments in the city.

You Said

545 responses were received to the Rough Sleeping Encampments consultation via the online and paper-based surveys, including alternative formats and face-to-face interviews.

Of the 545 people who responded to the Rough Sleeping Encampments consultation, 309 (58%) agreed or strongly agreed, 18% neither agreed nor disagreed, with 24% disagreeing or strongly disagreeing that the draft policy balances the needs of people sleeping rough in encampments with the needs of other members of the community. 214 (39%) respondents made comments or suggestions about the draft policy on rough Sleeping Encampments.

We Did

We made key changes to the policy including:

  • Tightening of the language used in the policy to ensure that the policy balances the needs of all communities
  • Inclusion of more explanation and definitions of terms
  • Policy aims have been revised and clarified in line with consultation responses

The policy will be going to Cabinet for approval later in the year.

We Asked

We asked about our proposals for the following elements of short breaks for disabled children:

  • Targeted Short Breaks
  • Options for a Personal Assistant sourcing support service
  • Widening eligibility for short breaks to include children who have ADHD with complex needs
  • Reducing the short breaks transport fund to be a hardship fund for those in greatest need

You Said

You said that there is a lack of information and awareness about targeted short breaks.

Services were not fairly distributed through the city. Transport is a big issue for a lot of families who struggle or find it impossible to use public transport.

A range of feedback on specific proposals

We Did

We listened to your feedback and included it in the final commissioning plan which was approved by Cabinet on the 2nd October 2018. This included a smaller reduction to the Short Breaks transport scheme than was originally proposed.

The link to the final commissioning plan, which was approved by Cabinet is here and the consultation report itself here.

We Asked

The Council adopted legislation in 2012 which gave it the ability to control and regulate Sex Establishments. A policy was developed at that time and the Council reviewed it through this consultation.

The questionnaire will be used to inform the draft policy, and a further consultation on the draft policy will take place later in the year.

This questionnaire was focused on all types of sex establishments, and a description of each type was included in the further information section at the start of the questionnaire.

You Said

The questionnaire received over 1,400 responses which will be used to further inform the Sex Establishment Policy.

We Did

The draft policy will be available for further consultation in due course, and the full results will also be available at this time.

We Asked

The consultation on the council’s proposal to introduce a new HMO licensing scheme in 12 central wards of Bristol was open for 12 weeks from 19 February 2018 until 13 May 2018. This consultation is now closed.

The consultation sought feedback from the public (including tenants, landlords and other citizens) on the licensing proposals, including the cost of a licence and various discounts, and asked for information about respondents’ experiences of renting or living near Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs).

You can see the consultation information booklet and map through the links below:

Information Booklet

Map

You Said

We received nearly 2,750 responses to the consultation survey, the results of which are available in the Consultation on proposal for an additional licensing scheme for houses in multiple occupation 2018 report.

We Did

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We Asked

Bristol City Council is responsible for setting the school term and holiday dates for all Community and Voluntary Controlled schools in the city. This consultation includes the proposed dates for the 2019/20 school year

Other schools are responsible for setting their own dates so these may vary from those set by BCC.

Officers from across the South West have consulted each other and agreed the dates to be consulted to ensure as much consistency across the region as possible.

The dates agreed with other Local Authorities have been the subject of consultation running 5th February 2018 to 16th March 2018.

The dates are agreed by working alongside neighbouring Local Authorities, in particular South Gloucestershire, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset.  Effort is made to ensure there is consistency for cross border movement by residents who work or attend school in a county different to where they live. If this is not achieved there can be considerable issues for children, parents and school staff.

Therefore, these neighbouring LAs have been consulting on the same dates.

You Said

A limited number of responses to the consultation have been received.  

One comment was concerning the term end date being Monday 20th July 2018.  Whist not ideal, this was necessary to ensure the correct number of school days and reduce the number of part weeks in the rest of the year. It is assumed that most schools would use this day as a potential inset/teacher training day.

Other responses offered alternative dates.  These included.
1.    Adding two extra dates into the October half term (taken from the beginning of the summer holiday)as preferable to an 8 week term 1.
2.    Changing the term dates to allow for shorter terms/more flexibility for holiday date
Both of these options although valid and a consideration for future years would mean different term dates than the neighbouring Local Authorities, therefore, creating other issues with consistency.
 
The general feedback was otherwise been positive.

We Did

The final decision was passed through school's forum and the decision was made to go with the following dates:

Term 1: Monday 2nd September 2019 to Friday 25th October 2019 (40 School Days)
Term 2: Monday 4th November 2019 to Friday 20th December 2019 (35 School Days)
Term 3: Monday 6th January 2020 to Friday 14th February 2020 (30 School Days)
Term 4: Monday 24th February 2020 to Friday 3rd April 2020 (30 School Days)
Term 5: Monday 20th April 2020 to Friday 22nd May 2020 (24 School Days)
Term 6: Monday 1st June 2020 to Monday 20th July 2020 (36 School Days)

A downloadable version of the term dates calendar can be found in the BCC website.
 

 

We Asked

The Local Authority has a statutory responsibility to ensure that there is sufficient good quality childcare in the area.  Consultation on the draft plan for the recommissioning of the Childcare Development and Sustainability Service was carried out during the 15th January 2018 to 11th March 2018. 

You Said

We received 135 responses.  Please see the attached link for further details. https://democracy.bristol.gov.uk/documents/s23554/Appendix%20B%20-%20Consultation%20Report%20Final.pdf

We Did

Following consultation, the Childcare Development and Sustainability Service received Cabinet approval on the 3rd July 2018 and went through a competitive tender process in 10 July 2018.  This service will commence on the 1 January 2019 with a maximum annual cost of £305,000.

Please see item No 10 from this link https://democracy.bristol.gov.uk/ieListDocuments.aspx?CId=135&MId=3092&Ver=4

We Asked

Between 28th November 2017 and 20th February 2018 we asked for comments and feedback on the draft Bristol Sport & Active Recreation Facility Strategy.  The benefits of having a Sport & Active Recreation Facility Strategy include helping to protect and enhance existing provision; informing the assessment of planning applications and proposed developments; helping to prioritise deliverable projects; ensuring a ‘strategic approach’ to getting the right facilities in the right places; helping to address inequalities in levels of provision across the city and attracting investment from relevant partners.

The public consultation had the following features:

  • Online survey designed so people could comment on the facilities most relevant to them, without having to complete pages of information.
  • Online survey publicised through extensive list of council equality group contacts.
  • Online survey publicised extensively through council and partner communication channels.
  • Paper versions of survey distributed at several council leisure facilities.
  • Three month consultation period designed to ensure maximum opportunity for third sector organisations and individual members of the public to respond.

You Said

A total of 461 responses were received with the majority choosing not to answer the questions on the overall strategy document, instead choosing to respond to specific facility issues.

With the responses on specific facilities the largest number were made on swimming pool provision.  Of the swimming pool responses, 162 made comments specifically referring to Jubilee swimming pool.  A further 54 made comments referring to swimming in general. 

The other highest responses were on sports halls and cycling facilities/wheels parks.  Both of these facility types figure prominently in the draft strategy and comments made were generally supportive of the proposals.

We Did

The draft strategy and supporting information has been updated to reflect any inaccuracies identified.

A consultation report which summarises all the feedback has been prepared.  Respondents who requested feedback by submitting an email address will receive this report directly. It can also be requested by emailing Craig.Hyslop@bristol.gov.uk or by downloading it at the bottom of this webpage.

Responses from the public consultation do not significantly affect the proposals related to major facilities or other actions and opportunities identified in the draft strategy.  The issue of swimming pool provision is well documented in the city and the responses/information gained through the consultation will be added to the large amount of information on the topic already gathered.  There is also a swimming specific report prepared which will be circulated alongside the main summary report to those respondents who requested feedback.  Again, this report is available on request to anyone else from Craig.Hyslop@bristol.gov.uk or by downloading it at the bottom of this webpage.

The overall direction of the strategy remains unchanged.  As a result of public consultation the narrative in some parts of the document has been amended to reflect more accurately the current position.

We Asked

By April 2019 the council has a target to reduce what it spends each year on parks by at least £2.868 million.  This means services will need to be run in a very different way; we will need to work more with communities, make more money, create more partnerships, make services as efficient as possible and reduce some of the things we do now.  As we move forward we want to be positive and ambitious for our parks whilst being clear that we have to work differently to maintain a much valued level of service citywide.

In order to make the savings, we have taken the approach of trying to earn as much money as possible so we can keep service reductions to a minimum.  The alternative would be to make the savings by reducing the service and removing facilities which cost the council a considerable amount of money to keep and maintain.

Between 6 November 2017 and 29 January 2018, we consulted on proposals for:

  • generating more income from parks;
  • reducing some existing service provision to reduce costs;
  • increasing the number of pay and display parking spaces in parks, and increasing the parking charges on sites that already have pay and display parking; and
  • proposals for the Parks Service to be delivered by a Trust or similar organisation rather than the City Council Council.

In addition to the Parks & Green Spaces survey, we hosted drop in sessions in Netham, Knowle West, Henbury and Brentry and City Hall with parks officers available to discuss the content of the consultation with members of the public.

This consultation has closed.

The proposals on which we consulted are described in the full survey document.

The consultation document translated into British Sign Language is available here: BSL Parks and Green Spaces Consultation

You Said

We received 2670 responses to the survey.

A consultation report which summarises this feedback is being prepared and will be published on this website later in the Spring

We Did

We will update this section when decisions have been made about the proposals

We Asked

We asked residents, businesses, the development sector and other stakeholders to make their duly made representation/s on the JSP Publication Document

The third phase of consultation on the JSP ran from Wednesday 22nd November 2017 to Wednesday 10th January 2018.

You Said

2,554 respondents submitted a total of 4,769 duly made representations.

A summary of the main issues raised in the representations submitted is set out in the engagement report (Regulation 22) Engagement Report of Key Issues raised at Regulation 19 Consultation (April 2018). 

This is available to view on the West of England JSP website (JSP Submission Document library):

www.jointplanningwofe.org.uk/consult.ti/JSPPublication/viewContent?contentid=346611

We Did

We submitted the JSP to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on 13th April 2018.

On this date the JSP entered the ‘examination stage’It is during this stage where the independent Inspector reviews the plan and its supporting evidence base and has regard to the duly made representations.

The Inspector will determine whether the plan is sound and therefore ready to be adopted. This stage involves examination Hearing sessions. The Inspector will make a report back to the local authorities and may propose further amendments. Once satisfied that the Plan meets all planning rules and laws, each council will then consider whether or not to adopt the Plan. Subject to that approval, the JSP would sit above and guide the review of the councils’ own Local Plans.