Consultation & Engagement Hub

Welcome to the Bristol City Council Consultation & Engagement Hub.  This site will help you find and participate in consultations that interest you.  Recently updated consultations are displayed below; alternatively, search for consultations by keyword, postcode, interest etc.

If you would like information on any of our consultations in another format, including paper copies, please
telephone 0117 922 2848 or email: consultation@bristol.gov.uk.

To keep up-to-date of new consultations, subscribe to ASK Bristol our email newsletter.

Visit Bristol Citizens' Panel for more information about this group.

If you are looking for advertisement of Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) or Temporary Traffic Regulation Orders (TTROs) you can find them on the council's website.

Featured consultations

  • Budget 2022-2023 Consultation

    Every February, the council sets a budget for the next year which details how much money we will be able to spend on each of the services the council provides. We are consulting on options for the level of Council Tax next year (from April 2022-March 2023) to help cover some of... More

    Closes 17 December 2021

Open Consultations

  • Budget 2022-2023 Consultation

    Every February, the council sets a budget for the next year which details how much money we will be able to spend on each of the services the council provides. We are consulting on options for the level of Council Tax next year (from April 2022-March 2023) to help cover some of... More

    Closes 17 December 2021

  • Sex Establishments Policy consultation 2021

    Sex establishments include sex shops, sexual entertainment venues, and sex cinemas. You can find more information about what these are here . The number and type of sex establishments permitted in various parts of Bristol are defined in a Sex Establishment Policy. The current... More

    Closes 19 December 2021

  • Broomhill Roundabout Improvements Engagement Survey

    The council have secured funding to provide an improvement scheme for the Broom Hill mini roundabout junction on the B4058 and any related traffic managment and / or highway measures. The funding has been put in place to meet planning conditions of the 350 new homes that were built as part of... More

    Closes 22 December 2021

  • A draft One City Food Equality Strategy for Bristol 2022-2032 consultation

    People in Bristol have unequal access to nutritious, affordable and sustainably sourced food. Food inequality has been made worse by COVID-19 and is further threatened by impacts of Brexit and climate change. It is people who are already most disadvantaged who will feel the impacts of food... More

    Closes 23 December 2021

  • Welcome and introduction to the topics

    The first assembly session gave participants an introduction to Bristol's assembly and an overview of how an assembly works. Mayor of Bristol Marvin Rees, Deputy Mayor, Cllr Asher Craig and Cllr Paula O’Rourke welcomed assembly members and introduced why the assembly has been called and... More

    Closes 31 December 2021

Closed Consultations

  • Investing in council homes consultation

    This is an opportunity to decide our key priorities for providing and maintaining council homes in Bristol for the next 30 years. We want to do this with as much input as possible from residents, councillors, colleagues and other organisations we work with. We own and manage over... More

    Closed 3 December 2021

  • Cotham Hill Permanent Scheme Consultation

    We are asking residents, businesses and anyone who enjoys Cotham Hill to comment on three possible permanent schemes. Over the summer, the council provided more space for walking and cycling on our streets to support social distancing during COVID-19. This included installing two... More

    Closed 30 November 2021

  • Knowle West Health Park engagement

    What do you want to see built at Knowle West Health Park? Earlier this year, the council launched a consultation on proposals for new housing in Knowle West, including an initial vision for Knowle West Health Park. Having considered the feedback from this... More

    Closed 22 November 2021

  • Kellaway Avenue / Wellington Hill West Junction Refurbishments

    We are proposing to carry out some proposed road safety improvement works at the crossroad junction with Kellaway Avenue and Wellington Hill. The traffic signals at this junction need replacing due to their age and condition. The current layout also only provides pedestrian crossings... More

    Closed 14 November 2021

  • Consultation on Scheme for Financing Schools

    1. Local Authorities are required to publish schemes for financing schools setting out the financial relationship between them and the schools they maintain. Bristol’s current scheme was last updated in May 2017. 2. Changes to the scheme can be initiated by the LA or be directed... More

    Closed 8 November 2021

We Asked, You Said, We Did

See what we've consulted on. See all outcomes

We asked

The consultation on the proposal for property licensing schemes in Bedminster, Brislington West and Horfield was open for 10 weeks from 17 March 2021 until 26 May 2021. Individual responses were received via the survey and additional responses were received from organisations and individuals via email and letter.

You said

We received 1,409 responses to the consultation, the results of which are available in the Property licensing scheme 2021 consultation report.

We did

The decsion will be taken at Cabinet on 14 December 2021.

If approved a  public notice will be issued within 7 days of decision and consultees and those affected by the decision will be contacted within two weeks.

We asked

The engagement on Greville Road was open for four weeks from 18 March to 18 April 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved and provide feedback on their own experiences.

The survey also asked people to give their views on some proposals to make Greville Road one-way or make it access-only by closing the road at one end or halfway.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a translation offer covering 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 641 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. As COVID-19 restrictions prevented face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey, we received 727 responses, which were made up of 608 online and 119 paper copies. Of the responses received, 97% are residents who live within one mile and more than 93% said they walk to the road.

Around 76% of respondents said they like Greville Road because it is “close to North Street shopping area” and 53% said they like the “personality and character of the street”. The most serious problem identified was “the pavements are too narrow” (34%) followed by “the street is busy with traffic” (33.9%). Over 59% of respondents think “maintaining motorised vehicle access to the street” is an essential priority for Greville Road.

Most respondents either disagreed or strongly disagreed with all four of the different road layout options proposed to restrict access to motorised traffic via either a new one-way system or road closure on Greville Road. 48% of comments were against the proposed changes to road layout, commenting either that they were not needed or highlighting concerns that changes would impact other local roads. Here, 22% of comments in this section called for a neighbourhood-wide approach.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. There were comments for and against the different road layouts proposed throughout the survey, but the responses did not show a consensus among the community. We will therefore not be implementing the suggested changes at this time.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.

We asked

The engagement on Mina Road was open for six weeks from Monday 1 February 2021 to Sunday 14 March 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise in three sections of the road. These were:

  • north of the mini roundabout – between the railway tunnel and where Mina Road meets York Street and James Street;
  • south of the mini roundabout – between the M32 and where Mina Road meets York Street and James Street;
  • the shopping area - between  John Street and the mini roundabout.

In summer 2020 we installed a protected bike lane between the railway tunnel and Mercia Drive using temporary bollards. The survey also asked how well people think the current scheme was working and if they agree or disagree with keeping the bike lane.

The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved in the street environment and provide feedback on their own experiences.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a translation offer in 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 1715 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. As COVID-19 restrictions prevented face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 824 responses, which were made up of 454 online and 370 paper copies. Of the responses received, 81% are residents and 85% of respondents live on Mina or live within one mile. 87% of respondents said they walk to the road, 66% ride a bike and 52% drive a car or a van.

For the north section of Mina Road, more than 70% of respondents said they like the street for being close to the city farm and close to green spaces. When asked what they viewed as problems, 51% of respondents felt the street is busy with motorised traffic and 50% feel air quality is too poor. More than 50% of respondents think having cleaner air and improving the Concorde Way cycle route are essential and high priorities.

For the south section of Mina Road, more than 78% of respondents said they like the personality and character of the street and it being close to green spaces. 85% of respondents felt the most serious and moderate problems were the street being busy with motorised traffic and poor air quality. Over 55% of respondents felt cleaner air and prioritising more road space for cycling are essential and high priorities.

For the shopping section of Mina Road, 81% of respondents said like the personality and character of the street and 73% of respondents like it for being close to local businesses. 85% of respondents felt the most serious and moderate problem was the street being busy with motorised traffic. 55% of respondents think cleaner air, making it easier to cross the road, and restricting traffic from and to the M32 are essential and high priorities.

When asked for their views on the temporary bike lane, 63.5% either agreed or strongly agreed the bike lane to remain in place,  compared to 21.57% who disagreed or strongly disagreed.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. It has been agreed to retain the protected bike lane from the railway tunnel and Mercia Drive.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.

We asked

Public consultation on the proposed transport improvements and river restoration works was undertaken between the 21 January 2021 and the 4 March 2021, a period of six weeks.

This sought to build on the feedback generated through an early consultation in February 2020 to improve travel through and within the area. The consultation asked for public feedback on the preliminary designs for transport improvements and river restoration works in Bedminster Green.

You said

388 people respondend to this consultation, the results of which  are available in the Bedminster Green Transport consultation report.

 

We did

The "Bedminster Green Transport - You Said, We Did" document shows how Bristol City Council is using the community feedback from the Bedminster Green Transport consultation to inform designs going forward.

 

 

We asked

The engagement on Redcliff Mead Lane and Prewett Street was open for four weeks from Monday 1 February to Sunday 28 February 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. The survey captured views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved in the street environment and provide feedback on their own experiences.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a language template covering 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 975 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. Due to COVID-19 restrictions preventing face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 162 responses to the engagement, which were made up of 50 online and 112 paper copies. Of the responses received 86% are residents who live within one mile and over 94% walk to the road.

Around 60% of respondents like Redcliff Mead Lane and Prewett Street due to it being “easy to walk around - there are good walking routes” and “close to shopping areas” (51%). The most serious problem identified “the air quality is too poor” (42.1%) followed by “the traffic speeds are too high (36.3%). Over 58% of respondents think “more greenery/planters” and “cleaner air” (56%) are essential priorities.

Option A proposed to close Redcliff Mead Lane where it meets Prewett Street but there was no majority support for either option. 44.5% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed and 39.1% of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed with this option. Option B proposed to close Prewett Street at Proctor House and 46.2% of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed and 40.6% agreed or strongly agreed with this option.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. There were comments for and against the proposed road layout changes throughout the survey, but the responses did not show a consensus among the community.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.