Consultation & Engagement Hub

Welcome to the Bristol City Council Consultation & Engagement Hub.  This site will help you find and participate in consultations that interest you.  Recently updated consultations are displayed below; alternatively, search for consultations by keyword, postcode, interest etc.

If you would like information on any of our consultations in another format, including paper copies, please
telephone 0117 922 2848 or email: consultation@bristol.gov.uk.

To keep up-to-date of new consultations, subscribe to ASK Bristol our email newsletter.

Visit Bristol Citizens' Panel for more information about this group.

If you are looking for advertisement of Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) or Temporary Traffic Regulation Orders (TTROs) you can find them on the council's website.

Featured consultations

  • Edward Colston Statue Exhibition and Survey

    The statue of Edward Colston was pulled down on 7 June 2020 during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol. One year on, the statue now forms part of a new display at M Shed to start a city-wide conversation about its future. The statue is on display alongside a selection of placards from... More

    Closes 3 October 2021

  • Corporate Strategy 2021

    The Corporate Strategy describes our vision for the council, the services we deliver, and what we want to achieve with our partners in Bristol and beyond. The strategy sets out our main priorities for the coming five years, and it informs everything the council does and how we plan for the... More

    Closes 26 September 2021

Open Consultations

  • Corporate Strategy 2021

    The Corporate Strategy describes our vision for the council, the services we deliver, and what we want to achieve with our partners in Bristol and beyond. The strategy sets out our main priorities for the coming five years, and it informs everything the council does and how we plan for the... More

    Closes 26 September 2021

  • Dovercourt Housing Proposals Consultation

    We are consulting on proposals for a residential development of approximately 140 homes on the Dovercourt Depot site in the residential area of Lockleaze, off Dovercourt Road. Please share your views to help us shape this Outline Planning stage. This is the second round of public... More

    Closes 30 September 2021

  • Edward Colston Statue Exhibition and Survey

    The statue of Edward Colston was pulled down on 7 June 2020 during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol. One year on, the statue now forms part of a new display at M Shed to start a city-wide conversation about its future. The statue is on display alongside a selection of placards from... More

    Closes 3 October 2021

  • Youth Zone Public Engagement

    As we emerge from the pandemic the effects of isolation on our young people, especially those in more disadvantaged communities, is apparent. Children and young people (CYP) in Bristol need us to invest in their futures. They need a place that helps them to learn new... More

    Closes 17 October 2021

  • Investing in the Energy Efficiency of our Community Buildings

    Community buildings offer a focal point for the community. This past year they have been at the heart of the COVID pandemic response. Community buildings can help to lead the way on energy efficiency in their communities and be part of helping achieve city wide net zero carbon... More

    Closes 31 October 2021

Closed Consultations

  • Draft concept plan for land off New Fosseway Road

    Working with a multi-disciplinary design team, Bristol City Council is bringing forward plans to transform the former New Fosseway School site, the land to the rear of New Fosseway Road, Hengrove. We carried out an initial stage of local engagement earlier this year.... More

    Closed 12 September 2021

  • Gambling Act Policy Review 2021

    One of the requirements of the Gambling Act 2005 is for the council to produce a Statement of Gambling Policy setting out how gambling will be regulated in Bristol. The Gambling Act requires local authorities to review their policy every three years. The current... More

    Closed 15 August 2021

  • Greville House – Consultation Phase 2

    Bristol City Council’s new build development team is developing a residential planning application for the former Greville Elderly Persons Home (EPH) site on Lacey Road, Stockwood. The intention is to deliver 100% affordable housing on this site, the actual split of the... More

    Closed 2 August 2021

  • Alternative Learning Provision Consultation

    Alternative Learning Provision (ALP) is where children and young people can receive an education if they aren’t able to remain in school some or all of the time. This can be for health reasons, exclusion, or because they need some additional support. Bristol’s vision is for ALP that helps... More

    Closed 23 July 2021

  • Extra Care Housing Commissioning Plan Consultation

    Bristol City Council is reviewing the care and support services delivered in Extra Care Housing (ECH) that are funded by the council’s Adult Social Care budget. The council is looking at what services are delivered and how the council would like to commission (buy) these services in the future.... More

    Closed 18 July 2021

We Asked, You Said, We Did

See what we've consulted on. See all outcomes

We asked

The engagement survey for Dean Lane was open for four weeks from Monday 11 January 2021 to Sunday 7 February 2021. People were asked about the street environment, what they liked about it, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. People were also asked to comment on proposals to install a protected bike lane along Dean Lane. The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses Dean Lane to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved and assess the appetite for the protected bike lane.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with an offer of language translation included in 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 1,023 local properties. 30 posters were also put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. Due to Covid-19 restrictions preventing face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 737 responses to the engagement, which were made up of 571 online and 166 paper copies. Of the responses received, 87% are residents who live within one mile from Dean Lane and over 92% walk to the road, almost 56% use a car/van, and over 54% use a bicycle. Over 72% of respondents use the road over 3 to 4 times a week.

When asked what people already like about the street environment on Dean Lane, “close to Dame Emily Park” and “close to shopping areas” are the most popular with 51% of respondents selecting these options. Meanwhile, 75% of respondents say, “pavements are too narrow” is a serious or moderate problem, 64% say “the street is busy with traffic”, 59% think “there is not a dedicated space for cyclists on the road” is a problem, and 58% say “the road feels unsafe to cycle on.” “Widen pavements” was ranked as essential/high priority by 66% respondents, and “make it easier to cross” by 64% respondents.

Over 63% of respondents agree or strongly agree with implementing a protected bike lane on Dean Lane, and 23% disagree or strongly disagree.

The main themes that came through the free text boxes were the road being unsafe to cross, speeding traffic, narrow pavements, and blind corners.  

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders is currently being reviewed. More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.

We asked

A six-month statutory consultation was undertaken, from 2 August 2020 to 1 February 2021, to receive objections on the permanent introduction of bus lanes and other supportive measures that would change how general traffic accesses some parts of the city centre.

An Experimental Traffic Order was used to install 24hr bus priority routes over Bristol Bridge and at key points accessing the city centre. Priority was provided to public transport, taxis, cycles and pedestrians travelling through the central area of Bristol.

The six-month consultation period meant the public could experience the advantages and disadvantages of the priority measures, before giving their feedback on whether they should be permanent. 

For further information on the Bristol Bridge Experimental Traffic Order, visit:  www.bristol.gov.uk/transport-plans-and-projects/changes-bristol-bridge

You said

  • 865 representations were received in response to the statutory consultation.
  • 527 (61%) were objections, of which 40 expressed some support in principle.
  • 338 (39%) were comments of full support.

Please read the following document providing summary of the public objections received and our response based on it.  Objection summary and Officer responses.

We did

The consultation feedback was included in an objection report for consideration by the Interim Director Economy of Place, who subsequently reached a decision on 29 June 2021 to make the Experimental Traffic Order measures permanent.

In making the decision, it was considered that the scheme would achieve elements of the council’s wider transport policies and strategies to achieve cleaner air and transform travel in the city.

A copy of the *objection report as signed by Interim Director Economy of Place can be received upon request by emailing transport.engagement@bristol.gov.uk

* NB: The objection report provided upon request will be redacted for data protection and GDPR purposes. Relevant policy and strategy documents are referenced within the report

We asked

The engagement on Park Row, Perry Road, Upper Maudlin Street and Colston Street was open for six weeks from 14 December 2020 to 24 January 2021. 

People were asked to give their views on how they felt the temporary bike lane that was implemented in summer 2020 was going. They were also asked to give their views on the general street environment, what they liked about the streets, what they would improve and what would they prioritise for improvements. A further question was asked about the introduction of a cycle lane north bound on Colston Street, which was not part of the temporary scheme. The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the area to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible, paper copies with an offer of language translation included in 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 763 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted on Bristol City Council’s social media platforms. Initially all businesses were visited in person, but new COVID-19 restrictions in December 2020 prevented face to face engagement. From this point the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who wanted to ask questions and provide verbal feedback. Separate meetings also took place with the University of Bristol and Bristol Royal Infirmary to understand their needs and any potential impacts.

You said

From the engagement survey we received 460 responses, which were made up of 371 online and 89 paper responses. Of the responses received, 50% are residents who live within one mile and 70% lived within two miles. Over 70% of respondents walk to the road, 57% ride a bike and 48% drive a car or van, while 15% catch the bus.

60% of respondents liked the area due to the “local high street economy”, 52% like the “personality and character of the street”, and 44% like it due to access to the hospital.

The most serious and moderate problems identified were “Street is busy with traffic”(78%); there is too much pollution/poor air quality (75%); “there is too much congestion” (74%); and “Access for disabled people is poor” (64%).  In terms of problems related to cycling, 64% thought the “road feels unsafe to cycle on” and 64% thought there being “no protected cycle lane outside the hospital” was an issue.

The survey provided boxes for “other” comments which asked people to give their views on the temporary bike line. People were also asked to comment on the proposal to create an additional protected bike lane northbound on Colston Street. Most comments mirrored the priorities above with various suggestions of how the cycle lanes might be improved including surfacing, protection at junctions and removal of large breaks between the bollards that allowed parking. Many also commented that the crossings outside the hospital and at the bottom of St Michaels Hill needs to be improved. There were 125 comments in support of the suggestion to introduce a bike lane on Colston Street and 38 comments against.

Most of the businesses in the area are independent shops providing a range of services, some of which were very specialised. Businesses have raised concern about the removal of parking for shoppers and space and access for deliveries. They were also concerned that the scheme may have negative impacts on traffic congestion. It must also be noted that the changes coincided with free parking at Trenchard Street Car Park that were offered to hospital staff during COVID-19 restrictions, reducing the availability of parking spaces for shoppers in the area. 

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders will be used to help produce some designs for a more permanent solution for walking and cycling improvements on these streets.  There will be further engagement with the community on next steps once these designs are completed.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in either the summary report or the full report.

We asked

The engagement on Picton Lane was open for six weeks from Monday 14 December 2020 to Sunday 24 January 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. The survey captured views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved in the street environment and provide feedback on their own experiences.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a language template covering 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 3,694 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. Due to COVID-19 restrictions preventing face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 776 responses to the engagement, which were made up of 333 online and 443 paper copies. Of the responses received 91% are residents who live within one mile and over 94% walk to the road.

Around 92% of respondents like Picton Street due to the “personality and character of the street”. The most serious problem identified with 50% was that “there is no space for recycling bins and waste collection on street” followed by 43% with “the road is too narrow for two-way traffic” and 35% saying “access for disabled people is poor”. Over 43% of respondents think “wider pavements for movement” and “wider pavements with designated waste collections areas” are essential.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. There were comments for and against pedestrianisation throughout the survey, but the responses did not show a consensus among the community. We will therefore take forward the comments received from the survey as we develop our Liveable Neighbourhood strategy for the city. This will involve looking at whole areas, rather than individual streets, to make neighbourhoods a more pleasant place for everyone with safer streets, cleaner air, and easier walking and cycling journeys. More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in either the summary report or the full report.

We asked

The engagement on Cotham Hill was open for six weeks from Monday 9 November 2020 to Sunday 17 January 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. The survey captured views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved in the street environment and provide feedback on their own experiences.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a language template covering 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 3348 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. Due to Covid19 restrictions preventing face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 2632 responses to the engagement, which were made up of 2075 online and 557 paper copies. Of the responses received 60% are residents who live within one mile and over 80% walk to the road with over 65% visiting the street over 3 to 4 times a week.

Around 90% of respondents like Cotham Hill due to the “local high street economy” and “personality and character of the street”. Over 60% felt it was a “place for meeting friends and family” and over 70% like “supporting local jobs”. Over 85% of respondents think “pavements are too narrow” is a serious and moderate problem. Over 80% of respondents “have wider pavements” as an essential and high priority for the street.

The main themes that came through the free text boxes were support for pedestrianisation, outdoor seating space and wider pavements.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been used to help produce a road layout design for two temporary road closures on Cotham Hill. This will be implemented on Sunday 11 April 2021 to allow several hospitality businesses to trade outside with COVID-19 restrictions changing to permit outdoor hospitality service the following day. It will also improve journeys for pedestrians and cyclists. Whilst this is an urgent measure to support business we are working on a more permanent scheme which will be subject to further engagement with the community. This will take a look at a more holistic approach at the area and could incorporate changes to the wider area.
More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in either the summary report or the full report.