Consultation & Engagement Hub

Welcome to the Bristol City Council Consultation & Engagement Hub.  This site will help you find and participate in consultations that interest you.  Recently updated consultations are displayed below; alternatively, search for consultations by keyword, postcode, interest etc.

If you would like information on any of our consultations in another format, including paper copies, please
telephone 0117 922 2848 or email: consultation@bristol.gov.uk.

To keep up-to-date of new consultations, subscribe to ASK Bristol our email newsletter.

Visit Bristol Citizens' Panel for more information about this group.

Featured consultations

  • Your City Our Future citizen survey

    Covid-19 has caused great disruption to our lives and livelihoods. The city will need to recover and we now have a once in a lifetime opportunity to rethink what kind of future we want for Bristol. In this survey you can tell us what you liked and disliked about living in Bristol... More

    Closes 28 September 2020

Open Consultations

  • Bristol Streets - A37/A4018 Transport Corridor Improvements

    We want to hear your ideas for improvements to the A37/A4018 transport corridor. The corridor starts in Stockwood and travels along the A37 through Knowle and Totterdown into the central area calling at Temple Meads. It then heads north along the A4018 and travels into Henleaze, Southmead and... More

    Closes 21 September 2020

  • Your City Our Future citizen survey

    Covid-19 has caused great disruption to our lives and livelihoods. The city will need to recover and we now have a once in a lifetime opportunity to rethink what kind of future we want for Bristol. In this survey you can tell us what you liked and disliked about living in Bristol... More

    Closes 28 September 2020

  • Broad Plain public realm strategy consultation

    The Broad Plain strategy area is undergoing rapid social and economic change as new development transforms the area into a flatted, residential quarter. The public realm strategy focusses on the area bounded by Temple Way, Old Market Street, Midland Road, New Kingsley Road/Horton Street and Avon... More

    Closes 18 October 2020

  • City Centre Cumulative Impact Assessment Consultation

    Bristol City Council is responsible for licensing and regulating businesses where there is the sale of alcohol, provision of regulated entertainment or the provision of late night refreshment. This normally covers businesses such as pubs, clubs, restaurants, hotels, off licences and late... More

    Closes 28 October 2020

  • Consultation on the future of Jubilee Pool

    The council has committed to better connect people to accessible and affordable leisure facilities so they can be active and lead healthier lives. This commitment has seen us invest heavily in south Bristol facilities including Hengrove Leisure Centre. ... More

    Closes 8 November 2020

Closed Consultations

  • Bristol Local Plan Managing the development of HMOs: Draft Supplementary Planning Document

    We sought views earlier this year on a new draft Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) relating to the development of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs). This guidance will support existing Local Plan policy used to decide planning applications for this type of accommodation. The policy aims... More

    Closed 11 September 2020

  • Review of Public Space Protection Orders

    There are a number of Public Space Protection Orders (PSPO) across the city which are valid until 19th October 2020. They are an area based order intended to deal with a particular nuisance or problem that is detrimental to an areas use. They are intended to ensure that the area can... More

    Closed 21 August 2020

  • Home Care and Extra Care Housing

    Bristol City Council has a responsibility to arrange good quality care and support services for people who are eligible for Local Authority support. Some people receive care and support in their own home and this service is called Home Care. Some people choose to move into accommodation built... More

    Closed 30 April 2020

  • Proposed School Term Dates 2021/2022

    This consultation includes the proposed dates for the 2021/22 school year. Term 1: Thursday 2nd September 2021 to Friday 22nd October 2021 (37 School Days) Term 2: Monday 1st November 2021 to Friday 17th December 2021 (35 School Days) Term 3: Tuesday 4th... More

    Closed 28 April 2020

  • Mayoral governance in Bristol: Has it made a difference? Report by Bristol Universities

    Every 4 years a joint Bristol Universities project conducts formal analysis on the mayoral leadership model, and what the city's leaders & people think about this. Quality of Life survey results, Citizens’ Panel and other surveys were set up and used as part of their formal evaluation &... More

    Closed 1 April 2020

We Asked, You Said, We Did

See what we've consulted on. See all outcomes

We Asked

We sought feedback from the local community on initial ideas for improving the River Malago and the green, and improving travel around and through the area with better routes for public transport, walking and cycling. We also proposed changes to parking in the area with a new decked car park proposed on the site of the current Little Paradise Car Park.

You Said

Please read the following documents providing the public feedback and our response based on it:

Bedminster Green River Restoration Community Engagement Feedback

Bedminster Green Transport Community Engagement Feedback

We Did

Please read the  documents above providing the public feedback and our response based on it.

We Asked

Background and Overview

It is the responsibility of all Admission Authorities to set admission arrangements which adhere to regulations set by the Department for Education’s (DfE) School Admissions Code (2014) ensuring a clear and fair access protocol is in place for all school applications.

Admission arrangements are set by Bristol City Council for all Community and Controlled schools.  Other schools are responsible for setting their own arrangements. This includes all secondary schools as well as many primary schools.

Decision Details

Minor alterations were made to the wording from the 2020/2021 arrangements, changing dates for the admissions process to suit the relevant academic year.  The key principles however, including the order of the oversubscription criteria remain unchanged from previous years.

Bristol City Council’s annual duty to set admission arrangements also includes determining the number of children to be admitted into the reception year for Community and Controlled schools.  In order to comply with the School Admissions Code these arrangements need to be formally agreed by 28th February in the year prior to admission year.  Once the admission number is set schools cannot admit fewer children (assuming there are sufficient applications) but can admit more children. 

Demand for reception places has been reducing and some schools are experiencing difficulty with the number of children starting where infant class size regulations require multiple classes but these classes have a significant number of spaces.  For example, a school with a PAN of 60 will plan for 2 classes.  35 children start, leaving 25 spare places.  Pressure on school finances means that this is unsustainable.

Therefore a further proposal was to reduce the Published Admission Number (PAN) at some maintained primary schools.

The following schools requested a reduction to their PAN:

  • Nova Primary school – PAN reduced from 60 to 30
  • Summerhill Infant School – PAN reduced from 90 to 60

You Said

Public Consultation

A public consultation was open from 6th December 2019 through to 31th January 2020.  During this consultation the proposed admission arrangements and co-ordinated schemes for entry into Reception and Year 7 for the 2021/2022 cohorts as well as for in year applications and the proposed reductions in PAN were put online, allowing persons of interest including; school staff, governors and parents/carers to submit comments and feedback.

The consultation was hosted on the BCC Citizen Space consultation page and promoted via contact with all Bristol nursery, primary and secondary schools, relevant academy trusts as well as on the BCC admissions webpage and Ask Bristol e-bulletin.  The consultation was targeted to schools and parents/carers as well as other relevant and interested parties.

We received seven responses.

There were no objections to the proposed admission arrangements and co-ordinated scheme for 2021/22.

Feedback was supportive of reducing PAN at Nova Primary School.

We received responses to Summerhill Infants PAN reduction with concerns about how this could impact the funding the school receives.  That staff will lose their jobs and would the LA support these staff members find jobs elsewhere?

Questions were also raised about how local primary schools had opened or expanded, such as Whitehall primary, to the detriment of Summerhill.   

We also received comments regarding how the falling primary school population could be managed by directing schools to set their PAN in order for all schools to stand the best chance of reaching capacity.  Hence some school’s reducing their PAN to support other schools and provide them with a better chance of survival.

  A response from Bristol City Council

Bristol City Council is proposing the decrease in PAN at both schools following conversations with senior staff and school governors in response to falling pupil numbers for primary age children across the city. With applications for the schools looking to be around one form of entry under PAN, the schools have to consider the impact this will have upon the way they structure their classes and organise staff.  Fewer pupils has a direct impact upon the amount of funding the school receives.  If schools are operating under capacity they are likely to face a cost deficit with funds needed for other recourses, including staff.  This is inefficient and unsustainable for a school.  Furthermore, it makes it difficult for them to maintain the high standards of education and wellbeing for the children.

As the proposed changes are not due to take effect until the 2021 academic year, this allows the school and staff time to make plans for the future.  The schools and their governors are responsible for the decision making process regarding staff. The LA would support the school through this process.

With regards to expansion at Whitehall, this was planned and implemented while demand for primary school places was still rising. The school is also very popular with local parents.   One of the key objectives for the LA is to meet parental preference. The school has remained heavily oversubscribed despite the increased places and falling pupil numbers in this part of the city.

The LA has a co-operative relationship will all maintained Bristol schools and we are working collaboratively with schools across the city to manage PANs in order to best meet forecasted demand.

We Did

The Decisions Taken

 

After reviewing the options available and considering the information at our disposal, the decisions taken have been:

  • To proceed with the proposed admission arrangements and co-ordinated schemes for primary and secondary schools 2021/2022.
     
  • To proceed with the proposal to reduce the pupil admission number at the following schools:
  • Nova Primary School - from 60 to 30
  • Summerhill Infant School - from 120 to 90

We Asked

The council was contacted by people living and working in Bishopston and St Andrews (parts of Redland, Ashley and Bishopston and Ashley Down wards) requesting extra parking controls to solve problems they experience with parking.

We are committed to listening to people’s views, and therefore wanted to hear your thoughts to help us decide if any parking changes are needed and would be supported more widely.
 
Why are we asking for your views now?

The council’s position is that there needs to be overwhelming support for a Residents’ Parking Scheme (RPS) in a community before a new RPS could be considered.
 
The council has undertaken a follow-up survey of all citizens, businesses and other stakeholders in the area shown in the map to gauge if the views we have received so far are representative of wider concerns in the area and, in the case of RPS, if there is evidence of overwhelming support in part or all of the survey area.

You Said

In the Bishopston and St Andrews survey area responses were received from 1,282 properties, out of 3,315 properties in the survey area.

1,618 responses were received in total from the 1,282 properties (there was more than one response from many households).

  • 70% of those responding  were in favour of Junction Protection
  • 60% of those responding were in favour of a Residents Parking Scheme

We Did

We Asked

The council was contacted by people living and working in parts of Southville and Bedminster requesting extra parking controls to solve problems they experience with parking.
 
We are committed to listening to people’s views, and therefore wanted to hear your thoughts to help us decide if any parking changes are needed and would be supported more widely.

The council’s position is that there needs to be overwhelming support for a Residents’ Parking Scheme (RPS) in a community before a new RPS could be considered.
 
The council undertook a follow-up survey of all citizens, businesses and other stakeholders in the area to gauge if the views we have received so far are representative of wider concerns in the area and, in the case of RPS, if there is evidence of overwhelming support in part or all of the survey area.

You Said

Responses were received from 1,945 properties, out of 7,115 properties in the survey area.

2,259 responses were received in total from the 1,945 properties (there was more than one response from many households). 

  • 80% of those responding were in favour of Match Day Parking
  • 73% of those responding were in favour of Junction Protection
  • 59% of those responding were in favour of a Residents Parking Scheme

We Did

We Asked

The consultation on the Council’s 2020/21 budget was open for six weeks from 23 October 2019 until 4 December 2019. Individual responses were received via the survey and face-to-face interviews, and additional responses were received from organisations and individuals via email.

More information about what we consulted on is available in the consultation survey.

You Said

We received 3,448 responses to the Budget consultation 2020/21, the results of which are available in the Budget 2020/21 consultation report.

3,315 (96%) of the 3,448 people who responded to the budget consultation, stated the level core Council Tax increase they would support in 2020/21, from the three options provided:

  • A majority of respondents (59%) favour an increase in core Council Tax to support general services. Of these, 1,175 (35% of all 3,315 respondents) favour a 2% increase and 777 (23%) would prefer a 1% increase in core Council Tax.
  • 1,363 (41%) respondents would prefer ‘no increase to Council Tax’ in 2020/21.

3,325 (96%) of the 3,448 respondents to the consultation, expressed a preference for a particular level of Adult Social Care Precept:

  • A majority of respondents (59%) favour an additional Adult Social Care Precept (on top of core Council Tax) to support the delivery of adult social care.
  • Of these, 1,042 (31% of all 3,325 respondents) favour a 2% Adult Social Care Precept and 926 (28%) would prefer a 1% Adult Social Care Precept.
  • 1,357 (41%) respondents would prefer no increase to Adult Social Care Precept in 2020/21.

We Did

The decision will be taken at Full Council on 25 February 2020.