Consultation & Engagement Hub

Welcome to the Bristol City Council Consultation & Engagement Hub.  This site will help you find and participate in consultations that interest you.  Recently updated consultations are displayed below; alternatively, search for consultations by keyword, postcode, interest etc.

If you would like information on any of our consultations in another format, including paper copies, please
telephone 0117 922 2848 or email: consultation@bristol.gov.uk.

To keep up-to-date of new consultations, subscribe to ASK Bristol our email newsletter.

Visit Bristol Citizens' Panel for more information about this group.

If you are looking for advertisement of Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) or Temporary Traffic Regulation Orders (TTROs) you can find them on the council's website.

Featured consultations

  • Consultation on improvements to the number 2 bus route (A37/A4018)

    Why we are making changes Bristol City Council is asking for your views on the proposed improvements to the A37/A4018 following the number 2 bus route. In 2020 ( 24 July 2020 to 21 September 2020 ) we asked people for suggested improvements to this route. We... More

    Closes 28 January 2022

Open Consultations

  • Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Services Consultation

    Bristol City Council provides support services for people affected by domestic abuse and sexual violence. The council currently spends £1.475m per year on the following: Counselling services for sexual violence survivors Accommodation-based support for women (and their children) who... More

    Closes today

  • Consultation on improvements to the number 2 bus route (A37/A4018)

    Why we are making changes Bristol City Council is asking for your views on the proposed improvements to the A37/A4018 following the number 2 bus route. In 2020 ( 24 July 2020 to 21 September 2020 ) we asked people for suggested improvements to this route. We... More

    Closes 28 January 2022

  • Admission Arrangements For Own Admission Authority Schools 2023 2024

    Bristol City Council is responsible for determining admission arrangements for all community and voluntary controlled (VC) school in Bristol. We are not responsible for decisions made on behalf of other schools including; academies, foundation and voluntary aided schools. ... More

    Closes 31 January 2022

  • LA School Admission Arrangements for 2023/2024 Academic Year

    Bristol City Council (BCC) is responsible for implementing the coordinated schemes for school applications and the allocation of school places for all mainstream schools in Bristol. BCC is also the Admission Authority for all community and voluntary controlled schools in the city. This... More

    Closes 31 January 2022

  • Filwood Broadway Housing Development – Consultation Phase 2

    The Filwood ‘cinema site’ is located in the local centre of Filwood Broadway, part of the residential Knowle West area to the south of Bristol city centre. This is one of several sites in South Bristol proposed for development by Bristol City Council to help meet the... More

    Closes 4 February 2022

Closed Consultations

  • Fostering Fees Consultation

    In Bristol we really value our foster carers and recognise the incredible positive impact their skills and expertise make to the everyday lives of children in care. The council’s Corporate Parenting Strategy was approved in January 2021 and sets out our ambition to make sure that... More

    Closed 20 January 2022

  • Consultation on improvements to Park Row, Perry Road, Upper Maudlin Street and Colston Street

    Why we are making changes Bristol City Council is asking for your views on the proposed improvements to Park Row, Perry Road, Upper Maudlin Street and Colston Street. At the end of 2020 (14 December 2020 to 24 January 2021) we asked people for their views on suggested improvements to these... More

    Closed 16 January 2022

  • Bathwells Road and Angers Road – proposals for highway improvements

    We are proposing to carry out some highway improvements works on Bathwells Road and Angers Road in Totterdown. Over the years residents have raised concerns regarding local roads such as Bathwells Road and Angers Road being used as a cut-through from the A4 Bath Road to A37 Wells... More

    Closed 9 January 2022

  • Whitehall Primary School - School Streets Survey

    Bristol City Council is proposing to create a temporary walking, wheeling, cycling and scooting zone on Johnsons Lane, a small section of Johnsons Road and Woodcroft Avenue. This would involve closing the road to non-essential vehicles for approximately 35-45 minutes at school drop-off and pick-up... More

    Closed 7 January 2022

  • Minerva Primary Academy School Streets Survey

    Bristol City Council is proposing to create a temporary walking, wheeling, cycling and scooting zone on The Greenway and a section of Cherrytree Crescent. This would involve closing the road to non-essential vehicles for approximately 45 minutes at school opening and closing times. The scheme... More

    Closed 7 January 2022

We Asked, You Said, We Did

See what we've consulted on. See all outcomes

We asked

The consultation on the council’s 2022/23 budget was open for six weeks from 5 November 2021 until 17 December 2021. Individual responses were received via the survey and additional responses were received from organisations and individuals via email.

More information about what we consulted on is available in the consultation survey.

You said

We received 1,304 responses to the Budget consultation 2022/23, the results of which are available in the Budget 2022/23 consultation report.

Increase in Core Council Tax 2022/23

A majority (842 respondents, 65%) favour an increase in core Council Tax to support general services in 2022/23*. Of these:

  • 582 (45% of all 1,304 respondents) favour a 1.99% increase;
  • 260 (20%) favour a 1% increase;
  • 444 (34%) would prefer no increase to core Council Tax and;
  • 18 (1%) did not give a view.

Increase in Adult Social Care Precept in 2022/23

A majority (740 respondents, 57%) of respondents favour an additional 1% Adult Social Care Precept (on top of core Council Tax) to support the delivery of adult social care.**

539 (41%) respondents would prefer no increase to Social Care Precept in 2022/23.

25 (2%) did not give a view on Social Care Precept.

Six proposed approaches to saving money and generating income

1,281 (98%) of the survey respondents gave their views on one or more of the of six money saving and income generating approaches that are proposed to bridge the forecast budget gap in 2022/23. Of these:

  • 95% agreed with the proposal to improve efficiency;
  • 90% agreed with the proposal for digital transformation;
  • 87% agreed with the proposal for propery and capital investment;
  • 78% agreed with the proposal to be more business-like and secure more external resources;
  • 65% agreed with reducing the need for direct services;
  • 51% agreed with redesigning, reducing or stopping services. 

*1.99% is the maximum amount the council can raise Council Tax in 2022/23 without holding a local referendum. This limit is set by government. 

** The council is allowed to add a Social Care Precept of up to 1% to Council Tax in 2022/23. This is in addition to the permitted increase of up to 1.99% for core Council Tax.

We did

The decision will be taken at Full Council on 15 February 2022.

We asked

The consultation on the proposal for property licensing schemes in Bedminster, Brislington West and Horfield was open for 10 weeks from 17 March 2021 until 26 May 2021. Individual responses were received via the survey and additional responses were received from organisations and individuals via email and letter.

You said

We received 1,409 responses to the consultation, the results of which are available in the Property licensing scheme 2021 consultation report.

We did

The decsion will be taken at Cabinet on 14 December 2021.

If approved a  public notice will be issued within 7 days of decision and consultees and those affected by the decision will be contacted within two weeks.

We asked

The engagement on Greville Road was open for four weeks from 18 March to 18 April 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise. The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved and provide feedback on their own experiences.

The survey also asked people to give their views on some proposals to make Greville Road one-way or make it access-only by closing the road at one end or halfway.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a translation offer covering 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 641 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. As COVID-19 restrictions prevented face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey, we received 727 responses, which were made up of 608 online and 119 paper copies. Of the responses received, 97% are residents who live within one mile and more than 93% said they walk to the road.

Around 76% of respondents said they like Greville Road because it is “close to North Street shopping area” and 53% said they like the “personality and character of the street”. The most serious problem identified was “the pavements are too narrow” (34%) followed by “the street is busy with traffic” (33.9%). Over 59% of respondents think “maintaining motorised vehicle access to the street” is an essential priority for Greville Road.

Most respondents either disagreed or strongly disagreed with all four of the different road layout options proposed to restrict access to motorised traffic via either a new one-way system or road closure on Greville Road. 48% of comments were against the proposed changes to road layout, commenting either that they were not needed or highlighting concerns that changes would impact other local roads. Here, 22% of comments in this section called for a neighbourhood-wide approach.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. There were comments for and against the different road layouts proposed throughout the survey, but the responses did not show a consensus among the community. We will therefore not be implementing the suggested changes at this time.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.

We asked

The engagement on Mina Road was open for six weeks from Monday 1 February 2021 to Sunday 14 March 2021. People were asked about their street environment, what they liked about the street, what they would improve and what would they prioritise in three sections of the road. These were:

  • north of the mini roundabout – between the railway tunnel and where Mina Road meets York Street and James Street;
  • south of the mini roundabout – between the M32 and where Mina Road meets York Street and James Street;
  • the shopping area - between  John Street and the mini roundabout.

In summer 2020 we installed a protected bike lane between the railway tunnel and Mercia Drive using temporary bollards. The survey also asked how well people think the current scheme was working and if they agree or disagree with keeping the bike lane.

The survey aimed to capture views from residents, businesses and anyone who uses the street to help build a picture of what people would like to see improved in the street environment and provide feedback on their own experiences.

Individual responses were received via the online survey and, to ensure the survey reached as wide an audience as possible in a multi-cultural ward, paper copies with a translation offer in 12 languages were posted along with a free post envelope to 1715 local properties. 25 posters were put up in the local area to raise awareness of the survey. Local stakeholders and community groups were also asked to help raise awareness of the survey and it was promoted via social media platforms. As COVID-19 restrictions prevented face to face engagement, the team offered virtual chats and phone appointments to anyone who didn’t want to submit a written response but wanted to ask questions and provide feedback.

You said

From this survey we received 824 responses, which were made up of 454 online and 370 paper copies. Of the responses received, 81% are residents and 85% of respondents live on Mina or live within one mile. 87% of respondents said they walk to the road, 66% ride a bike and 52% drive a car or a van.

For the north section of Mina Road, more than 70% of respondents said they like the street for being close to the city farm and close to green spaces. When asked what they viewed as problems, 51% of respondents felt the street is busy with motorised traffic and 50% feel air quality is too poor. More than 50% of respondents think having cleaner air and improving the Concorde Way cycle route are essential and high priorities.

For the south section of Mina Road, more than 78% of respondents said they like the personality and character of the street and it being close to green spaces. 85% of respondents felt the most serious and moderate problems were the street being busy with motorised traffic and poor air quality. Over 55% of respondents felt cleaner air and prioritising more road space for cycling are essential and high priorities.

For the shopping section of Mina Road, 81% of respondents said like the personality and character of the street and 73% of respondents like it for being close to local businesses. 85% of respondents felt the most serious and moderate problem was the street being busy with motorised traffic. 55% of respondents think cleaner air, making it easier to cross the road, and restricting traffic from and to the M32 are essential and high priorities.

When asked for their views on the temporary bike lane, 63.5% either agreed or strongly agreed the bike lane to remain in place,  compared to 21.57% who disagreed or strongly disagreed.

We did

The feedback from this survey along with the engagement with local businesses, community groups and local stakeholders has been reviewed. It has been agreed to retain the protected bike lane from the railway tunnel and Mercia Drive.

More information about what we engaged on and the results are available in the full report.

We asked

Public consultation on the proposed transport improvements and river restoration works was undertaken between the 21 January 2021 and the 4 March 2021, a period of six weeks.

This sought to build on the feedback generated through an early consultation in February 2020 to improve travel through and within the area. The consultation asked for public feedback on the preliminary designs for transport improvements and river restoration works in Bedminster Green.

You said

Transport Improvements:

388 people respondend to this consultation, the results of which  are available in the Bedminster Green Transport consultation report.

River Restoration:

388 people responded to this consultation online, the results of which are available in the Bedminster Green River Restoration Consultation Report.

We did

Transport Improvements:

The Bedminster Green Transport - You Said, We Did document shows how Bristol City Council is using the community feedback from the Bedminster Green Transport consultation to inform designs going forward.

River Restoration:

The Bedminster Green River Restoration You Said, We Did document shows how Bristol City Council is using the community feedback from the Bedminster Green Transport consultation to inform designs going forward.